All posts by Slingshot collective

Cultivate Consent Culture: Making Great Community Processes After #MeToo

The #MeToo movement has been a game changer, empowering many victims of sexual harassment and assault to step forward with their stories, raising the social consciousness of how utterly pervasive rape and sexual assault are in our culture.  But for a victim to come forward is only the first step.  Next, it is the responsibility of the community to act.  Here are some tips to help your community support the victims of sexual misconduct:

 

  • Be sure to have a community process decided on to address sexual misconduct figured out a head of time.  Having a process ready will help victims feel confident in stepping up.
  • One great community practice is if you have 3 people who are designated Consent Counselors in your community, and at every meeting, set aside 1-2 minutes to have those people raise their hands, and let everyone know that if anyone experiences behavior that makes them feel uncomfortable from within the community, they should talk to one of those 3 people.
  • Believe victims. Always.  No questioning.  No second-guessing.
  • Avoid punishment-based language. If someone is running around saying things like, “If I find out someone has been raped, I will break the rapists’ legs!” that is no good. Often victims are scared to speak up because they don’t want their rapist to get hurt.  By avoiding talking about punishing, you can make it easier for victims to step up.
  • Once a victim has stepped forward, always immediately remove the person who hurt them from their community spaces.  This isn’t a punishment thing, but rather about letting the victim have their community spaces be a safe place for them to heal.
  • It can be good to have some bouncer-types who are prepared to help if a perpetrator doesn’t want to leave.
  • Allow the victim to decide i/when it is time to let the perpetrator back into community. Let them do this on their own timeline.  It may take months, years, or a lifetime for them to heal, so don’t rush them.
  • Do not ever force the victim into a confrontation with the perpetrator–the perpetrator already took the victim’s power, and to have to face someone after they’ve hurt you like that is crazy-making.
  • If the victim has come forward and would like to do a Restorative Justice process, allow the victim to set the terms they need to feel safe with idea of the perpetrator re-entering community.  This might mean the perpetrator writing an apology letter, going to trainings, or listening to stories of other victims.
  • PRO TIP: Be wary of “NVC” (NonViolent Communication) systems set up to protect the emotional safety of abusers.  Often when victims step forward, they are in a state of trauma, which means they will have hard time controlling the tone of their voice.  We’ve seen NVC used by people who commit sexual and race-based violence to over and over claim that their victims are “the real bad guys” cuz they shouted after being attacked.  Avoid systems that emotionally police victims.
When there is no process to handle sexual misconduct, women are often the ones who get hurt–cis and trans alike–so having a great community process in place is the best way to help your community be safer and more inviting to women!
Consent culture is the solution to leaving behind the capitalist rape culture that harms so many victims–women, people of color, the poor, and the ecology. 
Compost capitalism and may consent culture bloom!
#CultivateConsentCulture
Special thanks to everyone at the Omni Commons, Nobolom Cooperative Bakery, Hellarity House, The Living Games Conference, and the L.A. Freeform and Theatre Larp Collective who have developed and tested different parts of the community processes featured above! We know these processes are working because there’s a higher percentage of women in these spaces than in other community spaces similar to them. Bringing in this type of intentionality *is* the revolution!

Slingshot calendar: Pitted Dates

June 8

Zine Festival – Scranton, Pennsylvania

June 14

They Owe Us – a week of action against the G8 – London, England www.theyoweus.org.uk/

June 14th to 18th

Redwood Coast Earth First! Rendezvous – Humboldt County, Calif. – info; contactefhum@gmail.com or 707-234-5257

June 15 • 2 pm

Occupy march & occupation – Union Sq. San Francisco

June 15 – 23

Wild Roots, Feral Futures direct action camp – Southwest Colorado feralfutures.blogspot.com

June 27

Trans March – Dolores Park, SF transmarch.org

July 1-8

Earth First Round River rendezvous – North Carolina earthfirstnews.wordpress.com

July 4

Rainbow Gathering – somewhere in Montana

July 7-14

Creative Maladjustment Week – events world-wide www.cmweek.org

July 21-28

Utah Tar Sands Action Camp – stop the first tar sands mine in the US from breaking ground beforeitstarts.org

July 21-28

Eastern Conference on Workplace Democracy – Philadelphia east.usworker.coop

July 23 – 29

Trans and Women’s Action Camp for folks who identify as women, transgender, transsexual, genderqueer and gender variant – Eugene, OR twac.wordpress.com twac@riseup.net

July 27

Deadline to finish calendar pages, turn in radical contact info, submit cover art, or give Slingshot suggestions for the 2014 Slingshot organizer

July 27/28 and August 3 and 4

Join Slingshot to make the 2014 Slingshot organizer – 3124 Shattuck Ave. Berkeley.

August 7 – 11

Earth First! Summer – Hastings area near the Bexhill-Hastings Link Road, UK summergathering@earthfirst.org.uk

August 7 – 9

Protest the American Legislative Exchange Council annual meeting – Chicago alecwc.org

August 10 – 11

Portland Zine Fest portlandzinesymposium.org

August 11 – 17

Free Cascadia Witch Camp freewitchcamp.org

August 17-20

Reclaim the Power protest & camp – West Burton power station, East Midlands, UK www.nodashforgas.org.uk

August 18 • 4 pm

Slingshot New Volunteer Meeting – 3124 Shattuck Berkeley

August 24-25

5th Annual Seattle Anarchist Bookfair at the Vera Project – seattlebookfair@riseup.net

August 24

Grand Rapids Zine Fest – Grand Rapids, MI

August 26-September 7

Trident Ploughshares Summer International Disarmament Camp – Burghfield, UK

August 30 – September 2

Twin Oaks Communities Conference – Louisa, VA communitiesconference.org

September 14 • 3 pm

Slingshot article deadline for issue #114

Introduction – slingshot issue #110

Note: our computer is not allowing us to include apostrophes in the text, so we have removed all apostrophes from the following text:

Slingshot is an independent radical newspaper published in Berkeley since 1988.

Oppositional politics is both boring and, right now, plentiful. What is more rare is searching for a window into new values, motivations, assumptions and sources of meaning. The new world has to give us something to live for. Our alternative projects can thrive, but only when the process of building something revolutionary is as fun, nourishing and meaningful as the end result and when our projects feed our own lives. Politics without heart is just perpetuating the mainstream systems we re trying to topple.

The new ways of living we re creating transcend the consuming and owning we re used to and bring us closer to a way of living that s ecologically sustainable — tracking the rhythms of the seasons and our own hearts, not 60 megahertz computer circuitry. We are forced into straight lines and easy-to-follow storylines, but when life is really important and intense, it is usually random, taking wild and absurd twists and turns. Some of the wild times we all go through is reflected in some of the pages that follow.

And another thing. Given the increasingly strange weather recently — tangible evidence that human emissions of greenhouse gases are disrupting the earth s climate — shouldn t there be riots in the streets or blockades of oil refineries and coal mines, or some hint that folks are worried and demanding a transition away from fossil fuel dependence? Instead, private industry is leading a massive oil, gas and coal investment boom while efforts to build solar or wind alternatives are declaring bankruptcy. The market won t save us, and in fact its increasing domination is bringing ecological collapse.

The will to fight like our life depended on it comes from giving a shit about the people and eco-systems around us and the simple pleasure of being alive to enjoy a warm afternoon. What s it gonna be?

• • •

This issue we debated a proposal to get a Slingshot twitter and facebook account. We have not been first-adopters of new technology because most of the time the newest thing is just another tool used to make us dependent and numb. We re committed to doing as much as we can to emphasize human beings, human needs and human passion. This means being engaged with ourselves, face-to-face with others around us, and with the earth. We ve noticed that always staring into a screen doesn t make us feel happy. . . .

It is hard to figure out the right balance in the modern world. We don t want to be forced to rely on each new gadget, but the point is to enrich our lives and empower people, not mindlessly strive to be some kind of techno-purist. At what point are tools so integrated into society and so helpful that avoiding their use is just silly?

Some folks in the collective argued that if you hate malls, you don t want to open a store in one — it gives credibility to the mall. After going around and around, we decided against facebook, but for getting a twitter account as an experiment to see if it helps us communicate in new ways. Let us know what you think or how we should use these tools.

• • •

The center poster depicts a tree-being escaping from the splint of state conditioning proclaiming the splendor of an eternal struggle — à la the Arab Spring and beyond. Revolution never stops.

Slingshot is always looking for new writers, artists, editors, photographers, translators, distributors, etc. to make this paper. If you send something written, please be open to editing.

Editorial decisions are made by the Slingshot Collective but not all the articles reflect the opinions of all collectives members. We welcome debate and constructive criticism.

Thanks to the people who made this: Angie, Ben, Claire, Darin, Eggplant, Gina, Holiday, Jesse, Joey, Jonathon, Kathryn, Kazoo, Kermit, Nuclear Winter, Solomon and all the authors and artists.

Slingshot New Volunteer Meeting

Volunteers interested in getting involved with Slingshot can come to the new volunteer meeting on Sunday August 26, 2012 at 4 p.m. at the Long Haul in Berkeley (see below.)

Article Deadline & Next Issue Date

Submit your articles for issue 111 by September 15, 2012 at 3 p.m.

Volume 1, Number 110, Circulation 19,000

Printed April 13, 2012

Slingshot Newspaper

A publication of Long Haul

Office: 3124 Shattuck Avenue

Mailing: PO Box 3051, Berkeley, CA 94703

Phone (510) 540-0751 • slingshot@tao.ca slingshot.tao.ca • fucking twitter @slingshotnews

Circulation Information

Subscriptions to Slingshot are free to prisoners, low income and anyone in the USA with a Slingshot Organizer, or $1 per issue or back issue. International $3 per issue. Outside the Bay Area we ll mail you a free stack of copies if you give them out for free. Each envelope is one lb. (8 copies) — let us know how many envelopes you want. In the Bay Area, pick up copies at Long Haul or Bound Together Books in SF.

Other Slingshot Free stuff

We ll send you a random assortment of back issues of Slingshot for the cost of postage: Send $3 for 2 lbs. Free if you re an infoshop or library. Also, our full-color coffee table book about People s Park is free or by sliding scale donation: send $1 – $25 for a copy. We also have surplus copies of the 2012 Organizer available free to a good home. Email or call us: slingshot@tao.ca / Box 3051 Berkeley, 94703.

Frack Attack! JULY 1-7, 2012

Note: for unknown reasons, our computer is not allowing us to include apostrophes in text on the website, so we have replaced all apostrophes with a *. Sorry for the inconvenience:

Marcellus Shale Earth First! is hosting the 2012 Earth First! Round River Rendezvous July 1-7 which will culminate in direct action against fracking in the Marcellus Shale region that includes parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, and Maryland. The Rendezvous is an annual convergence of radical eco-activists with workshops and trainings — the exact location will be announced closer to July.

Hydraulic fracturing (fracking) is a relatively new process for oil and natural gas extraction spreading rampantly across the US. It involves drilling deep down into the earth*s crust, then drilling horizontally and injecting hundreds of thousands of gallons of very high pressure water mixed with various chemicals and sand which fractures rock formations near the drill, allowing extraction of oil and gas. Drillers use a variety of up to 539 chemicals in frack jobs, including toxic or carcinogenic ones like benzene, lead, ethylene glycol, methanol, boric acid, and 2-butoxyethanol. Companies have refused to disclose which chemicals they inject into particular wells, citing trade secret protection.

Fracking can cause water contamination if drilling fluid leaks into aquifers or if fluid that comes back to the surface is not disposed of properly. There are thousands of frack wells in dozens of states including the Marcellus and also Texas, North Dakota, Colorado, Louisiana and New Mexico. Some wells can use millions of gallons of water. Fluid that returns to the surface contains drill chemicals as well as toxic or radioactive metals leached from rock underground. Some of this fluid is ending up in local rivers.

The expansion of fracking is increasing supplies of domestic oil and gas, causing natural gas prices to plunge. This is leading to increased reliance on gas to generate electricity, instead of non-polluting technologies like wind or solar, which are having a hard time competing with cheap gas. Drillers claim gas is a “green solution” since burning gas to make electricity emits less carbon dioxide that burning coal, but having easy access to cheap gas is prolonging reliance on fossil fuels and will ultimately increase CO2 emissions and global climate change.

Fracking is exempted from both the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act and remains under-regulated. Due to the depressed economy, lack of EPA oversight, and especially strong-arming of the gas companies, fracking is expanding even as many local communities organize to prevent contamination.

Direct action in July will fit in with MSEF*s work with local groups to build effective resistance in rural areas against fracking. No drilling! No compromise!

Contact susquehannaearthfirst@gmail.com, occupywellstreet.blogspot.com, or Marcellusearthfirst.rocus.org for info.

Building eco systems of community – Andrea Prichett wins Slingshot award for Lifetime Achievement

Note: for unknown reasons, our computer is not allowing us to include apostrophes in text on the website, so we have replace all apostrophes with a *. Sorry for the inconvenience:

Slingshot awarded its 7th annual Award for Lifetime Achievement to Andrea Prichett at our 24th birthday party in March. Andrea is a corner stone of the Berkeley radical scene and a remarkable presence at street protests — usually standing close to a scary line of police filming what they*re doing. During all the occupy protests recently, we counted on running into her during the tense moments. She has a sly smile and carefully chosen words, chewing on a toothpick while sitting on her bike.

Slingshot created our lifetime achievement award to recognize direct action radicals who have dedicated their lives to the struggle for alternatives to the current system. Front-line radicals frequently operate below the radar and lack widespread recognition, which is too bad. While awards can be part of systems of hierarchy, a complete lack of recognition for long-term activists robs us of chances to appreciate and learn from the contributions individuals can make during a lifetime of organizing. Thanks, Andrea, for your continuing contributions to the struggle. Here*s a short biography of Andrea.

Andrea grew up in Connecticut and remembers being fascinated by the American revolutionaries and the US Constitution, which were a big part of the culture in the area. “Tri-corner hats were cool.”

When she was 13, she moved to Hollister, California. She was struck by how Latinos and Anglos were segregated, coming together at school but mostly living separately in the community. She wanted to escape the constraints of the small town. In high school she went to Model UN conferences in Berkeley and loved the culture here. She remembers sneaking away from the Model UN to see the Rocky Horror Picture Show at midnight. When she finished high school, she only applied to the University of California (UC) Berkeley. “If I hadn*t gotten in, I wouldn*t have gone to college,” she recalls.

At Berkeley it took her awhile to get involved in the radical scene. She attended a meeting of a Maoist front group, met some members of the Sparticist League and then gave up any affiliation with them once it became clear that they had no appreciation for spiritual ideas and beliefs.

During the summer of 1984 Andrea joined an affinity group to do art actions around campus in the middle of the night. A group of people got arrested and a community coalesced around their arrest. “Everybody had to come together to defend our comrades. It was our fear of university repression that made everyone feel like they couldn*t just walk away and go home,” she explained.

Andrea*s community got organized just as the international anti-apartheid movement was heating up. Apartheid in South Africa was a legal system of racial segregation and enforced white supremacy. Less than 20 percent of South Africans were white, yet whites controlled most of the wealth and power. In 1983 and 84, black South Africans protested daily against a new racist constitution and were met with vicious force. Daily TV coverage of the repression sparked international protests against apartheid and reinvigorated efforts to get US businesses and governments to stop doing business with the racist South African government.

Andrea describes the anti-apartheid movement in Berkeley as a perfect storm. Activism in South Africa was inspiring and motivating students abroad. “We were ready to take their lead” she explains. Students at Berkeley started having direct actions outside of University Hall demanding that the University of California divest from South Africa by dropping investments in companies doing business in South Africa. In December 1984, students and celebrities got arrested for sitting down in front of University Hall, where the bureaucrats running the whole 9-campus University of California system were based.

At the same time, connections were being built between students, radical elements in the labor movement, and radicals from the community off campus. These connections inspired even greater student activism. At the time, The Daily Cal, the campus paper, published numerous investigative articles exposing UC connections with South Africa.

Andrea became a key student leader in the UCB anti-apartheid movement and remembers talking to black South Africans who were saying, “Why aren*t you being more active — why aren*t you taking on the system more directly?” The movement in Berkeley confronted complex dynamics of race, class and political differences that prepared her for later activism in which she has observed those dynamics playing out again and again. Some parts of the movement favored symbolic actions, while other parts favored more disruptive direct resistance, and there was race baiting between the factions. She advises, “You don*t have to take it personal that these are things that come into play. But if it fits, take it personally.”

In late March and early April 1985, students occupied Sproul Plaza in a five-week long sit-in at the center of campus in front of the administration building. Andrea recalls that the sit-in faced, “the same challenges that Occupy Oakland faced with a prolonged encampment” — dealing with nightly police harassment employing divide and conquer tactics and trying to address the basic needs of homeless people who joined the sit-in. Despite the challenges, the sit-in was successful in confronting the university on a daily basis and building a thriving protest community of students and non-student fighting for divestment. 400 people were arrested over 44 days, including 156 arrested during a 6 am raid on April 16 that caused 10,000 students to boycott classes. The plaza was renamed “Biko Plaza” after South African student leader Stephen Biko who was murdered by South African police in 1977. The occupiers published the Biko Plaza News on a daily basis — which inspired creation of Slingshot 3 years later.

Despite the sit-in, the University failed to divest from South Africa in 1985. The next year, radicals constructed a shanty town in front of University Hall, sparking 2 nights of rioting on campus. Andrea hadn*t seen such extreme police violence — and resistance from the community — before. She remembers it being like “warfare without guns” including intense police beatings and the crowd throwing objects. She realized “a raw and ugly fact that the university doesn*t just represent capitalism but it is the gears of capitalism. . . . When people are resisting the university they are resisting control.”

With rumors that the National Guard was going to be called in, she was surprised to see how quickly the situation changed from “oh we*re having a little protest here; to resistance; to they*re really bringing down the hammer here.” It was an important lesson: the university is crucial target and a viable place for radicals to restrict the functioning of the system. In the wake of the shanty town, the university announced that it would divest from South Africa.

From 1987-89, Andrea lived in Zimbabwe traveling and working as a teacher. She worked at a school for ex-combatants who fought in the Zimbabwe revolution, which still existed when she returned to Zimbabwe in 2007.

Upon returning to the US, Andrea dropped by People*s Park although she hadn*t been involved in its struggles previously. She was struck by the prevalence of poverty in the US, which she saw with a new eye because of her time in Africa. She began organizing around the park, poverty and homelessness, and around Telegraph Avenue, which at the time functioned as a town square permitting discussion and interactions between many types of people.

But her efforts kept running into problems with the police who were harassing radicals and poor people alike around Telegraph Ave. In March, 1990 she and two other women called a meeting to start the first Copwatch group in the US. Her original idea was to mount patrols to watch and photograph the police to both limit and document their abuses. At the time, she says they weren*t thinking about similar patrols that the Black Panther Party had operated. Copwatch had an office on Telegraph, did a couple of patrols a week, and published a quarterly report. At first, it focused on Telegraph but eventually expanded to other areas.

In the pre-internet 1990s, Andrea mailed out copies of the Copwatch handbook and a video tape entitled Refuse to be Abused to anyone who asked. She went to national conferences of the National Association for Police Accountability and wrote articles about Copwatch*s successes in Berkeley. Copwatch also ran a class at UC Berkeley that took students out on patrol. During weekly discussions of policing, students would say “I never thought about things this way before.” Gradually, Copwatch chapters spread throughout the US and around the world thanks to her tireless efforts.

While Andrea has been a mover and shaker with Copwatch for over 20 years, she*s also done many other things with her life. She taught at a private school and did some construction before earning her teacher*s credential in 2005 and becoming an 8th grade English and history teacher. “Being a teacher is wonderful — it*s like a garden where something is going to grow, as opposed to activism where you can put in years and not necessarily see anything happen.”

Andrea played music with Rebecca Riots for 8 years and enjoyed being in a band that could play benefits for radical groups. “I don*t think it*s enough to do music but maybe its not enough to just do activism either” she notes.

Being involved in a long-term project like Copwatch, Andrea explains that the project needs you and you need the project. “Copwatch gives me a way to connect to what rises and falls.”

“For all the activism I*ve done, the thing I*ve learned is that change is possible when we have relationships and community. Unless we have those relationships I can pass out fliers but nothing is really going to happen. We don*t have vast resources but we have social capital– built year by year that is crucial in the success of our projects. In the time of the internet, knowing a face and having trust is invaluable.” Andrea is focused on the “ecosystem of the community” — trying to figure out what is going to be good for the community and how to achieve it.

Thanks Andrea, and keep struggling!

Dates to watch out for – Calendar

Note: for unknown reasons, our computer is not allowing us to include apostrophes in text on the website, so we have replace all apostrophes with a *. Sorry for the inconvenience:

May 1

General Strike

MAY 5

Climate Impact Day 350.org

MAY 15-16

International Anarchist Theatre Festival – Montreal anarchistetheatrefestival.com

MAY 19-20

Montreal Anarchist Bookfair anarchistbookfair.ca

MAY 25

SF Critical Mass bike ride – Justin Herman Plaza in SF & worldwide sfcriticalmass.org/

June 1 – 3

Mobilizing and Organizing From Below conference – Baltimore, Maryland mobconf.org

June 16 – 24

Wild Roots Feral Futures – San Juan Mts. Colorado feralfutures.blogspot.com

June 22 • 3 pm

Trans March – Dolores Park SF transmarch.org

July 1- 7

Earth First! Round River Rendezvous – marcellusearthfirst.rocus.org

July 1- 7

Rainbow Gathering – Somewhere in White Mountain National Forest (Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Georgia) tbd in June: ask a hippie for details.

July 4 • 3 pm

TV smashing – Berkeley: People*s Park

July 25 – 28

Shut down ALEC – Salt Lake City see pg. 2

August 9-12

International anarchist meeting – St. Imier, Switzerland anarchisme202.ch

August 11 – 12 • 10 am – 5

Portland Zine Symposium 116 SE Yamhill pdxzines.com

August 17-19

Twin Oaks International Community & Coop conf communitiesconference.org

August 26

Slingshot new volunteer meeting / article brainstorm – 3124 Shattuck, Berkeley

August 27-30

Disrupt the Republican National Convention – Tampa, FL marchonthernc.com

August 29-September 3

Trans and Womyn*s Action Camp – Cascadia twac.wordpress.com

September 3-7

Disrupt the Democratic National Convention – Charlotte, NC protestdnc.org/

September 15

Article deadline for Slingshot #111 – please send us an article! slingshot@tao.ca

September 15 – 16

Twin Cities Anarchist Bookfair – Powderhorn Community Center, Minneapolis, MN

Slingshot Introduction – issue #109

Slingshot is an independent radical newspaper published in Berkeley since 1988.

Every time we make Slingshot, there’s that moment of panic when we realize all the shit we neglected to include in the paper. Yesterday, there was a huge protest in San Francisco’s financial district. There are still troops in Iraq (despite the fake pull out), as well as in Afghanistan, and these lingering wars are sucking up cash that could go to teachers. Even creepier, the recent announcement that US Marines will be stationed in Australia (?!) And what the fuck is going on with Pakistan? And all of us are biting our nails as the long-held squat (in which many of our collective’s members reside) is faced with the threat of eviction — maybe for real this time.

Part of what needs to be expressed in an unvarnished, earnest way is that we’re not okay with the way things are going and we’re turning our energy to something else. The community of people that create this newspaper want to live the struggle that has so recently engaged us to the limits of our ability — but we also want to record it. We don’t have to specialize in one task — observing or participating — in order to build powerful resistance.

We hope the existence of this project makes clear that anyone can step out against the machine and build alternatives. Making a paper is do-it-yourself — you can make it up, write it up, draw it up, figure it out and mail it out. You don’t have to be an expert or have training. If you’re thinking, struggling, writing or making art, we would love to meet you — don’t be shy — send us something.

• • •

Seen at the Seattle GA: someone made a motion to change the group’s website slogan to read: “Occupy Seattle: A Leaderful Movement” because “all of us here are leaders.” The motion was approved, but some folks immediately protested, explaining “some of us would prefer to be identified as leaderless.” The GA ultimately decided to change the website to read: “Occupy Seattle: A Leaderful and Leaderless Movement.”

• • •

While making this issue’s poster, we had a weekend-long brainstorm to come up with poster slogans. Here’s some of the ideas we came up with that we didn’t use. If you have artistic skills, please send us a poster for one of these, or an even better slogan you come up with:

• Whatever is Toppling Should Also Be Pushed

• Capitalism: Short Term Gain, Long Term Pain

• Take Action Seriously, but don’t take yourself seriously

• DEMAND LOVE

• Forget What You’ve Been Taught – Start by Dreaming

• Cut – Baker B

• Maintain the Perpetual Moral Unhinging of the Machine

• Speak to my Ass. My Head is Sick.

• Capitalism is over, get into it

• I would think of a slogan, but my brain isn’t there right now

• Why should our virtues be grave? We like ours nimble-footed

Goodbye Capitalism, I won’t miss you at all

• • •

Slingshot is always looking for new writers, artists, editors, photographers, translators, distributors, etc. to make this paper. If you send something written, please be open to editing.

Editorial decisions are made by the Slingshot Collective but not all the articles reflect the opinions of all collectives members. We welcome debate and constructive criticism.

Thanks to the people who made this: Anka, Ant, Baker B, Bird, Claire, Cyd, Eggplant, Glenn, Jess, Jesse, Joey, Josh, Kathryn, Kazoo, Kermit, Lew, Martin, Roxanne, Samara, Solomon and all the authors and artists.

Slingshot New Volunteer Meeting

Volunteers interested in getting involved with Slingshot can come to the new volunteer meeting on Sunday, February 26, 2012 at 4 p.m. at the Long Haul in Berkeley (see below.)

Article Deadline & Next Issue Date

Submit your articles for issue 110 by March 10, 2012 at 3 p.m.

Volume 1, Number 109, Circulation 19,000

Printed January 27, 2012

Slingshot Newspaper

A publication of Long Haul

Office: 3124 Shattuck Avenue

Mailing: PO Box 3051, Berkeley, CA 94703

Phone (510) 540-0751

slingshot@tao.ca • slingshot.tao.ca

Circulation Information

Subscriptions to Slingshot are free to prisoners, low income and anyone in the USA with a Slingshot Organizer, or $1 per issue or back issue. International $3 per issue. Outside the Bay Area we’ll mail you a free stack of copies if you give them out for free. Note: they come in 1 lb. packages – you can order 1 package or up to 6 (6 lbs) for free – let us know how many you want. In the Bay Area, pick up copies at Long Haul or Bound Together Books in SF.

Slingshot Back Issues

We’ll send you a random assortment of back issues of Slingshot for the cost of postage: Send $3 for 2 lbs. Free if you’re an infoshop or library. Also, our full-color coffee table book about People’s Park is free or by sliding scale donation: send $1 – $25 for a copy. PO Box 3051 Berkeley, CA 94703.

Accepting nominations for the 2012 Wingnut Award

Slingshot will award its eighth annual Award for Lifetime Achievement — the Golden Wingnut — at its 24th birthday party on Sunday, March 11 at 3124 Shattuck in Berkeley (8 pm). Slingshot created the Lifetime Achievement Award to recognize direct action radicals who have dedicated their lives to the struggle for alternatives to the current absurd system. Wingnut is the term some of us use to refer to folks who blend radicalism and a highly individual personal style — more than just another boring radical. Golden Wingnuts mix determination, inspiration and flair. The winner has their biography featured in our next issue, and will receive a wingnut trophy and super-hero outfit.

We’re looking for nominations. To be eligible, an individual has to be currently alive and must have at least 25 years of “service”. Please send your nominations by 5 p.m. on March 1 along with why a particular person should be awarded the Golden Wingnut for 2012 to slingshot@tao.ca.

Organizer – today & tomorrow

Thanks to folks who bought a 2012 Slingshot organizer – selling them funds this paper! We still have copies available if you want to buy one or make a wholesale order. If you like the Slingshot paper, please support us financially by buying an organizer. We’re offering a special deal to any occupations that want to distribute organizers as a fundraiser or give-away. If you have ideas of ways to give free surplus copies to low-income teens or other folks who are unable to afford one, let us know. Email slingshot@tao.ca.

So far the only major error we’ve spotted is that the full month calendar on a page for September doesn’t have the days of the week in the same order as a standard calendar. Instead of being arranged SMTWTFS, it is MTWTFSS. The days of the week aren’t written in on that page, so please write them in correctly yourself. We’ll try to proofread that section more carefully next year.

Sales were down a lot this year, continuing a pattern of decreasing sales over the last few years. Aside from the effects of recession and the declining number of independent bookstores that exist to carry the organizer, it seems like demand for a paper calendar is falling off as many people get smart phones. Our cousin the War Resister’s League Peace calendar which started publishing in 1955 announced that 2012 would be their last year in response to shrinking sales. If trends continue, Slingshot collective needs to consider alternate ways to raise funds pay to print the paper.

One idea floating around is to make an organizer “app” for the iphone and other smart phones. Making an “app” doesn’t seem as do-it-yourself as making the organizer, so we need help. If you know how to develop smart phone applications and want to help make a Slingshot organizer app, let us know. Also, let us know if you think it should be free (with an option to donate) or should we charge a few pennies? The idea would be a calendar with radical historical dates, radical graphics, a menstrual calendar, and a radical contact list, plus access to helpful DIY features. Let us know if you have ideas for what other bells and whistles we should consider.

Until paper is totally dead, we’ll be working on the 2013 organizer this summer. It will be available around October 1. Let us know if you want to help us make the 2013 organizer. Here is a timeline for the work:

• In May and June, we’ll edit, correct and improve the list of historical dates. Deadline for finishing: June 22. The following dates in particular need more radical events, so if you want to do some research, email us and we’ll email you what we have so you can add to it:

• January 25, 28

• February 9, 16-18, 22, 24, 25

• March 2, 13, 17, 18

• April 6, 13, 16, 19

• May 14, 16, 17, 20, 22, 23

• June 3, 22, 27, 30,

• July 6, 11, 19, 24, 29, 30, 31

• August 4, 5, 11, 13, 14, 17, 21, 26

• September 1, 6, 10 22-25, 29, 30

• October 5, 6, 9, 10, 14, 16, 29, 31

• November 2, 3, 7, 10-12, 14, 15, 24, 26, 28-30

• December 22-24, 31

We particularly like adding events from 2011/12 to the list of historical dates.

• If you want to design a section of the calendar, let us know or send us random art by June 22. Deadline to finish calendar pages or give us suggestions for 2013 is July 27.

• We need all new or confirmed radical contact listings and cover art submissions by July 27.

• If you have ideas for the short features we publish in the back, let us know by July 27. We try to print different features every year.

• If you’re in the Bay Area July 28/29 or August 4/5, we loving having help with the final organizer design — all done by hand, which is extra fun. Contact us. We especially need to find some really careful proofreaders.

Calendar

February 19 • 11 – 5

L.A Zine Fest – The Last Bookstore Zine wemakezines.ning.com

February 20 • Noon

Occupy 4 Prisoners – National Day Of Action – San Quentin, CA occupy4prisoners.org

February 25 • 1-6

NYC Feminist Zinefest- Brooklyn Commons wemakezines.ning.com

February 26 • 4 pm

Slingshot new volunteer meeting / article brainstorm – 3124 Shattuck, Berkeley

February 29 • 6pm

Funeral for capitalism – dancing on the grave to follow – Oscar Grant Plaza (14th & Broadway) in Oakland

February 29

Leap day action night – everywhere –www.leapdayaction.org

February 29

Shut down the Corporations national day of action vs. ALEC (see page 13) shutdownthecorporations.org

March 8

International Women’s Day www.internationalwomensday.com

March 10 • 3 pm

Article deadline for Slingshot #110 – email us something! slingshot@tao.ca

March 11 – 6-9 pm

Celebrate Slingshot’s 24th Birthday party – free food, music – 3124 Shattuck Ave. Berkeley

March 30 • 6 pm

SF Critical Mass bike ride – Justin Herman Plaza in SF and worldwide

March 31 – April 1

Bay Area Anarchist Book Fair County Fair Building Lincoln Way & 9th Ave., SF sfbookfair.wordpress.com

April 1

Berkeley Anarchist Students of Theory and Research & Development (BASTARD) conference – sfbay-anarchists.org

April 10 – 12 • 10 am

The Art of Social Justice – Tivoli Student Union – Auraria Campus, Denver CO.

April 14 •

NYC Anarchist book fair – Judson Memorial Church, Manhattan.

April 15

Steal Something from Work Day stealfromwork.crimethinc.com

May 1

Global General Strike on May Day / International Worker’s Day

May 5 • 10 am

Protest the American Psychiatric Association – Counter-Celebration. March. Protest mindfreedom.org/campaign/boycott-normal/occupy-apa

May 19-20 • 10 – 5

Montreal anarchist book fair info@anarchistbookfair.ca

June 9-10 • noon – 10

SF Free Folk Festival. Presidio Middle School 450 30th Ave www.sffolkfest.org

June 16-24

Wild Roots Feral Futures – San Juan Mountains, Southwest Colorado feralfutures.blogspot.com

July 25-28

Shut down ALEC – Salt Lake City (see pg 2)

August 17 -19

Twin Oaks Intentional Community & Cooperatives Conference communitiesconference.org